Welcome is Bologna

Piazzas, loggias and historical routes

Finestrella di Via Piella

Finestrella di Via Piella

This corner of the city is known as "little Venice". Looking out among the buildings, you can see one of the few stretches of running water, which was not covered with asphalt between the beginning of the twentieth century and the postwar period.

L'antico Ghetto Ebraico

L'antico Ghetto Ebraico

The layout of Bologna's 16th century ghetto can still be precisely traced amid the narrow streets in the medieval heart of the city under the Two Towers.

Corte Galluzzi

Corte Galluzzi

An archway on one side of Piazza Galvani in the Corte de' Galluzzi, a well-representative complex of what was an area consortium.

Piazza Maggiore

Piazza Maggiore

Piazza Maggiore is located at the very centre of Bologna. In the past the square underwent many changes and was further enriched with important buildings: Basilica di San Petronio, Palazzo dei Notai, Palazzo d'Accursio, Palazzo del Podestà and Palazzo dei Bianchi.

Piazza Nettuno

Piazza Nettuno

Piazza del Nettuno was given this name because it was built to give prominence to Statua del Nettuno, the statue that may be seen at its centre.

Piazza Santo Stefano

Piazza Santo Stefano

Piazza Santo Stefano is one of the most peculiar places in Bologna. Even though it is mainly considered as a square, it is not properly this: Via Santo Stefano widens to create this peculiar area that leads to the monumental group of buildings named after the same Saint.

Piazza di Porta Ravegnana

Piazza di Porta Ravegnana

Piazza di Porta Ravegnana (originally known as Porta Ravennate) is the place where “le due torri”, (the two towers, symbols of Bologna) and the statue of San Petronio (the patron Saint of the city) may be found.

Piazza Galvani

Piazza Galvani

Piazza Galvani is located behind Basilica di San Petronio and in front of the portico leading to Palazzo dell'Archiginnasio. At the centre of the square there is a marble statue by Adalberto Cencetti representing Luigi Galvani, a famous bolognese scholar mainly known for his research about bioelectricity, while observing the famous frog he used to study.

Piazza Aldrovandi

Piazza Aldrovandi

Piazza Aldrovandi, the square named after Ulisse Aldrovandi (1522- 1605), the father of modern geology.

Piazza Verdi

Piazza Verdi

Piazza Giuseppe Verdi is located in the city centre of Bologna, not far from “le due torri” (the two towers, symbols of the city), crossed by Via Zamboni, university centre par excellence.

Piazza San Martino

Piazza San Martino

The square can be divided into three different areas: two of them lead to via Valdonica and via Marsala respectively, and the third one is the yard of San Martino's Church.

Piazza dei Martiri

Piazza dei Martiri

Piazza dei Martiri was originally named after King Umberto I. It was built in 1889 when this area was still mostly rural; as a matter of fact, here there were the ancient gardens first belonging to the Poeti and then to the Garagnani families. In 1945 tha square was given its current name, Piazza dei Martiri, to homage people died in fighting Nazis and Fascists during WWII. 

Piazza Carducci

Piazza Carducci

Square dedicated to the Italian poet Giosuè Carducci. Here both Museo del Risorgimento and Museo di Casa Carducci (Resorgimento Museum and Carducci's house) are located.

Piazza VIII Agosto

Piazza VIII Agosto

The origins of this area, now known as Piazza VIII Agosto, may be traced back to the ancient Roman Empire. The area was acquired by the Municipality of Bologna in 1219 and from 1251 it came to be known as Piazza del Mercato because here the cattle market used to take place.

Via dell'Inferno

Via dell'Inferno

Via dell'Inferno was the main artery where many twisted streets ended: via de' Giudei, vicolo di S. Giobbe, vicolo Mandria, via del Carro and via Valdonica.

Via De' Giudei

Via De' Giudei

The ghetto is an ideal place for a relaxing stroll through its peaceful and hidden alleys, starting from via de' Giudei, which was the entrance for people coming from piazza di Porta Ravegnana.

Piazzetta Marco Biagi

Piazzetta Marco Biagi

Piazzetta Marco Biagi is located in the Jewish ghetto, between via dell'Inferno and piazza San Martino.

Via Galliera

Via Galliera

Via Galliera aligns a sequence of ancient palaces, often residences of senatorial families.

Via Indipendenza

Via Indipendenza

Via Indipendenza is the main street of Bologna. Now via Indipendenza is the heart of the shopping area

Canton de' Fiori - Flowers' Corner

Canton de' Fiori - Flowers' Corner

Charming stretch of street which currently houses the homonymous bar, it derives its name from the presence of some florists’. In the back of one of these, in November 1794, two university students - Luigi Zamboni (from Bologna) and Giovanni Battista De Rolandis (from Asti) – prepared an attempted insurrection against the papal government, soon failed.

Via Ugo Bassi

Via Ugo Bassi

Together with Via Rizzoli, Via Ugo Bassi occupies a portion of the ancient Roman main road ax, namely the urban stretch running in the direction west-east of the Via Emilia (189 BC).

Albergo del Pellegrino

Albergo del Pellegrino

A plaque, located on the façade of the present building (the original plaque of 1886 is kept inside the door) recalls the presence here of the Hotel del Pellegrino from 1500 to 1930.

Via Rizzoli

Via Rizzoli

The cafés, banks and shops of Via Rizzoli are  the contemporary image of the street that two thousand years ago was already present with  the name of Via Aemilia.

Via San Vitale

Via San Vitale

Via San Vitale is divided into two segments. The first starts from the foot of the Two Towers and reaches Piazza Aldrovandi and has a prevalently noble and upper-class character, and the second, from Piazza Aldrovandi to the gate, which, apart from a couple of exceptions, has a more middle-class and popular character.

Strada Maggiore

Strada Maggiore

Already part of the Roman Via Emilia, Strada Maggiore runs between arcaded medieval houses, palaces and churches, from Porta Ravegnana to Porta Maggiore.

Via Zamboni

Via Zamboni

Via Zamboni is a historic road situated in the centre of Bologna.
It's about 1 km long and it leads from the Two Towers to Porta San Donato, running through the whole university area.

Via D'Azeglio Massimo

Via D'Azeglio Massimo

Via D'Azeglio, with its luxurious shops, is the fashionable meeting point of the city.

Via Marconi

Via Marconi

In the nineteen thirties (1932-1936) the fascist administration completed the modern thoroughfare, initially named Via Roma, which was developed on the left-hand side with several buildings that reflected the modernist formalism of the time.

Via Riva di Reno

Via Riva di Reno

The name of “via Riva di Reno” derives from Canale di Reno, an underground channel that has been covered after WWII.

Via del Porto

Via del Porto

The street was the access to the Porto Naviglio, Bologna's docks for the transport of goods on the Canale Navile. In 1801, the Western part of the street was called Via dei Murelli  that was remaining about protection walls built for the security of pedestrians in the second half of the 16th century.