Welcome is Bologna

Archaeology

MAP

A representation of Bologna’s archaeological sites from the early Villanovian settlements, to the Etruscan "Felsina", or to the Roman "Bononia". Though sometimes they are not accessible to visitors (for instance the ruins of the Roman Theatre in Via Carbonesi not open to the public), many traces of the ancient Bologna speak of the city’s history through the centuries. A history that is also revealed in important sites located in the surroundings, such as in Marzabotto, Castenaso, Monterenzio, San Lazzaro, Ozzano and in many other places in Bologna region.

Archaeological excavations in Salaborsa

Archaeological excavations in Salaborsa

In the library Salaborsa, under the crystal floor of the covered square, a suspended platform guides the visitor along a fascinating and stimulating stroll through history.

Museo Civico Archeologico

Museo Civico Archeologico

The Archaeological City Museum is one of the most prestigious archaeological collections in Italy. It is quite representative of local history from prehistoric times to the Roman Age. The collection of Egyptian Antiquities is one of the most important in Europe, the second in Italy, for historical artistic quality, conservative state and number of objects, about 4,000. The numismatic collection of great value,  includes 100,000 units.

Teatro Romano

Teatro Romano

It was built during the early decades of the 1st century BC, when the inhabitants of Bononia gained the status of Roman citizens. After the first building works, the theatre structure was extended.

Torrente Aposa

Torrente Aposa

It is the only natural river in Bologna. It originates in the hills and empties into canale Navile. Torrente Aposa is 7500 meters long. Under Via Rizzoli there is a splendid ruin of Roman bridge that once made the passage of the "decumanum maximum" (Via Emilia) possible.